YES or NO

Interview of Pierre Huyghe by Claude Closky, July 5th 2002, initially published in Trouble #2, Paris.

All questions were derived from commentaries on Pierre Huyghe's work published recently.

Were you born in 1962?

 YES
 NO

Do you live in Paris?

 YES
 NO

Have you been interested in the discrepancies between the real and its representation in the modern entertainment industry media since the early 1990s?

 YES
 NO

Do you explore the question of how to counteract the entertainment industry's appropriation of an individual's own image?

 YES
 NO

Have you developed a reappropriation strategy that both uses and yet undermines Hollywood's technology and principles of exploitation?

 YES
 NO

Did you hire amateur actors who spent two weekends filming a remake of Hitchcock's classic Rear Window in a suburban building (Remake, 1994/95)?

 YES
 NO

Does this remake have obvious technical limitations?

 YES
 NO

Does it have an astonishing resemblance to the original?

 YES
 NO

Was your intention to give the viewer a chance to identify with the nonprofessional actors?

 YES
 NO

Are you more interested in interpretation than in representation?

 YES
 NO

Is the translation of films a way to appropriate contents for yourself?

 YES
 NO

Do you want to draw attention to the shifts in meaning accompanying this process?

 YES
 NO

Do you also make use of translation as an opportunity to question the notion of authorship?

 YES
 NO

-- of the role of the mediator?

 YES
 NO

-- of sovereignty over one's own space or time?

 YES
 NO

Are your works vehicles serving the ideal of translating meaning to create a universal image?

 YES
 NO

Did you make a film featuring Lucie Dolène, the French actress who provided the voice for Snow White in the French version of the Disney film, and who sued the company to regain the rights to her voice?

 YES
 NO

Does your film (Blanche Neige Lucie, 1997) show her once again singing a song from the film while her story is told in subtitles?

 YES
 NO

Do you consider that transfering objects into new contexts is equivalent to replacing them?

 YES
 NO

By doing this, do you want to create new oppositions and connections?

 YES
 NO

In your earlier works (Chantier Barbès-Rochechouart, 1994; Rue Longvic, 1994; Géant Casino, 1995; Little Story, 1995), did you reenact scenes from daily life in public places?

 YES
 NO

Did you photograph these scenes, turn the photographs into posters, and then place the posters on billboards at the various sites where the reenactements took place?

 YES
 NO

Do you return to the public space its own image?

 YES
 NO

Do you question their origins to draw attention to the time that has gone by?

 YES
 NO

Does Light Conical Intersect,1996, consist of the projection of a film made in 1976 by the American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (documenting his architectural intervention in a Parisian house) at the exact location where the film had been made twenty years before -- and where, in the meantime, massive architectural changes had occurred?

 YES
 NO

Do you intend to replace the medium or genre fiction with the documentary?

 YES
 NO

Are you concerned with activating the relations that appear between different media and genres?

 YES
 NO

-- between sound and image?

 YES
 NO

-- between two pictures in a series?

 YES
 NO

-- between a site and its media representation?

 YES
 NO

Do you want to show that these are particular sites where criticism and reappropriation can begin?

 YES
 NO

Does The Third Memory, 1999, feature Wojtowicz re-enacting the events of 28 years ago with scenes from the Hollywood version Dog Day Afternoon and archives of TV news of the event spliced in your film?

 YES
 NO

Did you invite the subject represented to take back his place at the very heart of the spectacular machinery that had dispossessed him of his own identity?

 YES
 NO

Is The Third Memory a probing critique of media spectacle?

 YES
 NO

Does your work question how diverse languages can apply to the same reality?

 YES
 NO

Do you think reality and fiction can be interchanged?

 YES
 NO

Do you think fiction is prior to historical fact?

 YES
 NO

Together with Philippe Parreno, did you purchase the copyright of a manga character from a Japanese animation company's commercial catalogue (Annlee, 2000, 2001, etc.)?

 YES
 NO

Was your intention to free her from her industrial fate and give her a multifaced life?

 YES
 NO

When interpreting your scripts, does Annlee become a recording device that engages the audience, honing their attention on various critical issues?

 YES
 NO

In the context of an art exhibition can Annlee carry a critical message about the articulation of subjectivity without losing her seductive powers?

 YES
 NO

Is it (Annlee) a critical laboratory for ongoing investigation of the condition of cultural production and display in the age of entertainment?

 YES
 NO

In Two Minutes Out of Time, 2000, and One Million Kingdoms, 2001, did you want cartoon fantasy and real emotion to meet?

 YES
 NO

Would you depict Two Minutes Out of Time as full of pathos and wonder?

 YES
 NO

Does your film Les grands ensembles, 2001, picture two apartment buildings displayed in artificial weather changes?

 YES
 NO

Does the bad weather imbue these extremes of architectural alienation (typically French HLM banlieue housing projects) with a romantic ambience?

 YES
 NO

In Les grands ensembles, do you speak about urban claustrophobia and architectural failure of the public housing projects erected in post-war France?

 YES
 NO

Does the accelerating flicking on and off of room lights turn the apartment towers into some unknown game board?

 YES
 NO

Does your work continually build on an investigation of overlapping phenomena and categories: the construction of collective memory and fictive narratives?

 YES
 NO

-- as well as cultural organization and production?

 YES
 NO

Does the film Block Party, 2002, you present at the Documenta11 recall the birth of Hip-Hop?

 YES
 NO

Did you want to evoke the hierarchies between the West and the rest of the world?

 YES
 NO